NFL marketing strategy; Marissa Solis a multicultural lens is crucial

Thanks to a ingenious football marketing strategy, the NFL was able to become one of the major leagues across the world. What role do Hispanics play in the NFL’s marketing strategy? Marissa Solis, SVP Global Brand & Consumer Marketing, NFL, shared some concepts on the NFL’s marketing plan going forward.

Marissa Solis, SVP Global Brand & Consumer Marketing, at the NFL said the NFL is “very serious about the Latino fan base.” As an example, she mentioned the recent “Por La Cultura” initiative for LatinX Heritage Month. When asked if the NFL would take a segmented or global (total market) approach to marketing to the Hispanic population, Solis argued that it would be a “multicultural approach” in which the context of every NFL marketing and communications campaign will play an important role. role. For example, communications on social networks will sometimes be in Spanish and sometimes in English.

NFL Marketing Strategy
Marissa Solis, SVP Global Brand & Consumer Marketing, NFL (Photo: Business Wire)

Prior to joining the NFL, Solis held executive positions at several PepsiCo companies for 16 years and led PepsiCo’s Hispanic business unit as general manager from 2017 to 2019 (a position now held by Esperanza Teasdale). Solis noted that a segmented approach with an independent Hispanic P&L and a dedicated advertising and marketing budget made sense for PepsiCo because it needed to drive growth in the Hispanic market, whereas the NFL might not necessarily. “Marketing will be multicultural. The United States is a multicultural country,” says Solis. “The NFL is a reflection of America as Latinos grow in cultural influence and not just numbers,” she added.

American culture is Latino culture. I even use the Spanish language for English speakers. Marketing in the United States must be viewed through a multicultural lens.

Solis was one of the speakers on “The Latin Mosaic, Myth and Misconceptions About America’s Fastest Growing Industry” panel, hosted by Chemistry Cultura last Wednesday in New York. The other panelists were Domenika Lynch, Executive Director Latinos & Society, Aspen Institute and Adrian Carrasquillo, National Reporter, Newsweek. The session was moderated by Mike Valdes Fauli, Chief Operating Officer, Chemicals.

NFL Marketing Strategy

Solis preferred to use the term “multicultural marketing” rather than “the total market approach” to refer to what she considers the right way to market in a multicultural America. “American culture is Latino culture. I even use the Spanish language for English speakers. Marketing in the United States must be seen through a multicultural lens,” she added. Solis considers herself a “three hundred percenter”: 100% Mexican, 100% American and 100% Texan. In this sense, the Aspen Institute Dominique Lynch noted that as a community, Hispanics are changing: “There’s a level of Americanness that I can possess, but still not deny my culture,” Lynch asserted. To Newsweek Adrian Carrasquillo, it is important that journalists can tell true stories about Latinos in an authentic way. He added that Latinos need to feel represented as part of the general public. Chemistry Valdes-Fauli pointed out that the Hispanic market is the second largest economy in the Spanish-speaking world after Mexico.

There is a level of Americanness that I can possess, without denying my culture.

Passionate Latino NFL Fans

According to the NFL’s Solis, “Latino NFL fans are the most avid. Latinos are a big part of the NFL. As an example of the NFL’s commitment to the Hispanic market and the importance of Latino culture in the United States, Solis cited Jennifer Lopez and Shakira’s performance during the 2020 Super Bowl halftime show in Miami.
According to Solis, AT&T, PepsiCo, and Ford are among the brands that are doing a great job of targeting Hispanics. These brands get some of the key nuances of marketing for Latinos, she said. “The NFL has a bit of work to do to get on this list,” she concluded.

TO VERIFY: How the NHL Arizona Coyotes team markets to the Hispanic population

William L. Hart